Category Archives: Lawyer disobeying order of tribunal

Oklahoma Supreme Court publicly censures lawyer who had been permanently suspended by bankruptcy court for disobeying order

Hello and welcome to this Ethics Alert blog which will discuss recent Oklahoma Supreme Court opinion censuring a lawyer who had been permanently suspended from practicing before the bankruptcy court for disobeying a bankruptcy judge’s order.  The case is State ex rel. Oklahoma Bar Association v. Oliver, case number Case Number: SCBD-6268 (Oklahoma Supreme Court, March 29, 2016).  The disciplinary opinion is here:  http://www.oscn.net/applications/oscn/DeliverDocument.asp?CiteID=477506

According to the opinion, the lawyer was suspended for 30 days by a bankruptcy judge in the Western District of Oklahoma on October 29, 2014, he was reinstated on December 1, 2014, and he was suspended again for 60 days on January 14, 2015.

In a show cause hearing on May 6, 2015, the bankruptcy judge told the lawyer that he had errors in nine documents that she had assigned for him to complete and required that he show cause as to why he should not be permanently suspended from practicing in that court. The lawyer stated that he had an attorney friend who would be willing to assist him with his filings.  The judge told the lawyer that he had 30 days to have a bankruptcy attorney who was well-versed in the local bankruptcy rules and guidelines to assist him and file a document confirming that attorney’s assistance. The judge also required the lawyer to resubmit the documents without any substantive or typographical errors.

The judge issued an order on May 7, 2015 confirming her instructions at the show cause hearing. The lawyer was required to refile the nine documents and, “(i)n doing so, (the lawyer) may not seek or obtain assistance from this Court’s law clerk, the staff of the Court Clerk’s office or any other person.”  The order also confirmed that the lawyer was required to file a document under oath from a bankruptcy attorney who was “well versed in the Local Rules and Guidelines of the court and the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure” and agreeing to assist in the preparation and filing of documents with the court.

On June 15, 2015, the judge permanently suspended the lawyer from practicing in the court after concluding that he had disobeyed her order by contacting a bankruptcy attorney who was admitted in that court and paying him $1,000.00 to prepare and provide the nine documents that she had required in the show cause order.

The bankruptcy attorney testified at the disciplinary hearing that the lawyer had only asked him to review the nine documents that he had already completed and that the $1,000.00 was for the attorney to continue to help the lawyer in his bankruptcy practice. The attorney submitted the agreement which stated that part of the $1,000.00 was to be credited to future months, and provided the amounts of future payment.  He also testified that he had contacted the clerk to obtain guidance on the court’s requirements and he not been asked to prepare the documents for the lawyer nor had he written them.  The opinion stated that the evidence did not support any discipline related to that issue.

The Bar trial panel recommended that the lawyer be publicly reprimanded for failing to provide notice to the Oklahoma Bar regarding his bankruptcy court suspensions. The panel also found that the lawyer did not deliberately conceal his suspensions and that he had admitted that his oversight resulted from his ignorance of the rule.  The lawyer had notified his clients of the January 14, 2015 sixty day suspension on April 21, 2015 and he admitted that he should have provided more timely notice of his suspensions to his clients.

The Bar prosecutor’s office recommended that the lawyer’s discipline be in the range of a public censure to a 6 month suspension.  After hearing the mitigating evidence and the witnesses, the trial panel recommended that the lawyer receive a public censure and found that “(t)here is no evidence of a deliberate effort at concealment.”  The panel also noted that the lawyer continued to attend bankruptcy CLE seminars even though he was no longer required to attend them.

The disciplinary opinion stated that the lawyer acknowledged his lack of expertise in computer skills and his frustration in trying to meet the federal court’s expectations in filing electronic pleadings and that he also admitted that he had failed to report his suspensions to the Oklahoma Bar and that he did not timely notify his clients of the suspensions.  The lawyer received a public censure; however, two justices dissented and stated that they would suspend the attorney for two years plus one day.

Bottom line:  This is an unusual case.  The lawyer was permanently suspended by a bankruptcy judge from practicing in (after being suspended on two previous occasions) and then failed to report his suspensions to the general counsel of the Oklahoma Bar Association and failed to “timely” notify his bankruptcy clients of the suspensions; however, he received only a public censure of his license to practice in Oklahoma.  This is an example of how discipline imposed by a federal bankruptcy court (or other federal or administrative court) does not automatically result in the same discipline by the state court, unlike state court discipline, which typically results in reciprocal discipline of the lawyer’s license to practice in other states.

Be careful out there.

Disclaimer:  this Ethics Alert  is not an advertisement and does not contain any legal advice, and the comments herein should not be relied upon by anyone who reads it.

Joseph A. Corsmeier, Esquire

Law Office of Joseph A. Corsmeier, P.A.

2454 McMullen Booth Road, Suite 431

Clearwater, Florida 33759

Office (727) 799-1688

Fax     (727) 799-1670

jcorsmeier@jac-law.com

www.jac-law.com

 

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Filed under Attorney discipline, Attorney Ethics, joe corsmeier, Joseph Corsmeier, Lawyer disobeying order of tribunal, Lawyer ethics, Lawyer Ethics and Professionalism, Lawyer failure to notify clients of suspension, Lawyer sanctions, Lawyer technology competence, yer disobey order of tribunal

Washington lawyer suspended for 1 year for courtroom behavior, including making a loud noise like an animal being killed

Hello everyone and welcome to this Ethics Alert which will discuss the recent disciplinary opinion suspending a Washington lawyer for one (1) year for, inter alia, making loud noise sounding like an animal being killed and falsely claiming that a deputy tripped her.  The disciplinary opinion is In the Matter of the Disciplinary Proceeding Against Kathryn B. Abele, Case No. 201,352-0 (August 27, 2015) and is here: https://www.courts.wa.gov/opinions/pdf/2013520.pdf

According to the opinion, the lawyer represented the father in a three-way child custody battle. The trial lasted 13 days and, according to the testimony, it was” unusual, complex, and contentious”.  “Throughout the trial, (the lawyer) was repeatedly admonished for interrupting the court and other counsel.  She slammed objects on the table and made loud comments when (the judge) ruled against her.”  When the judge told her to stop, she said “I did not say anything”.

In a post-trial hearing, the lawyer “made it clear that she wanted the case resolved that day because she intended to immediately appeal the court’s decision. The court told (the lawyer) that it would not be possible to conclude that day and that she would not sign (the lawyer’s) proposed findings.  (the lawyer) became angry and said to (the judge), ‘You’ve got to leave now. We have to take a break now.’ (The judge), inferring from the statement that (the lawyer) was going to ‘blow up,’ called for a recess. After (the judge) left the bench, (the lawyer)made a loud screaming noise that could be heard in other rooms in the courthouse.  Security was called, but (the lawyer) was not held in contempt for this outburst.”

In another post-trial hearing, “(the lawyer) repeatedly interrupted (the judge), even yelling to express her disagreement. When (the judge) directed staff to summon security, (the lawyer) announced, ‘I’m going to jail. I’m going to jail,’ placing her hands over her head, crossed at the wrists as if being handcuffed.  (The lawyer) walked out of the courtroom while court was still in session, causing the proceedings to come to a halt.  (The lawyer) reentered the courtroom and announced, ‘I’m leaving. I’m out of here …. I’m abstaining completely …. Good-bye.’”

The judge ordered court security to bring the lawyer back into the courtroom.  The lawyer initially refused but ultimately returned to the courtroom.  After she returned, the judge stated on the record that the lawyer had made “loud noises that to me sounded like an animal being killed and “I have been in these courts for 30 years, 18 as a judge. I have never heard anything- I have never heard any lawyer make any kind of noise or do anything like that before.”  The lawyer “again yelled at the judge, attributing her previous scream to a hip injury and claiming that her yelling was the result of a hearing disability.”

The judge then held the lawyer in contempt.  She responded by stating: “Your Honor, I appreciate your lecture. Could you just tell me how much I have to pay in a fine so I can get rid of it and take care of it and resolve this issue with you?” After leaving the courtroom, the lawyer yelled, “That bitch”.  The judge had told the lawyer that she could purge herself of contempt if she contacted the Lawyer’s Assistance Program and she complied the next day.

According to the opinion, the lawyer also made a complaint about being tripped after she confronted a security officer who was called earlier in the day to respond to her alleged disruptive behavior in a courthouse hallway.  The lawyer forced her way between the officer and another security marshal, brushing against the second marshal’s knee. “(The lawyer)  immediately spun around, pointed and yelled,” accusing the marshal of tripping her. She called 911 and made the same accusation.  “The responding officer reviewed the security video and decided it did not support (the lawyer’s) version of events.”  The opinion found that the lawyer knowingly making a false and misleading statement to a law enforcement officer.

The lawyer argued that the stress of the litigation should be considered as a mitigating factor; however, the opinion rejected that argument.  The opinion imposed a one (1) year suspension and ordered that the lawyer complete an evaluation to determine her fitness to practice before being reinstated and pay all of the costs and expenses.

Bottom line: As Vin Scully might say, “Oh my.”  This lawyer engaged in some very bizarre conduct and it would certainly appear that it might be attributable to the extreme stress of the “contentious” 13 day trial and/or some serious underlying psychological issues.

Be careful out there.

Disclaimer:  this e-mail is not an advertisement, does not contain any legal advice, and does not create an attorney/client relationship and the comments herein should not be relied upon by anyone who reads it.

Joseph A. Corsmeier, Esquire

Law Office of Joseph A. Corsmeier, P.A.

2454 McMullen Booth Road, Suite 431

Clearwater, Florida 33759

Office (727) 799-1688

Fax     (727) 799-1670

jcorsmeier@jac-law.com

www.jac-law.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under joe corsmeier, Joseph Corsmeier, Lawyer conduct prejudicial to the administration of justice, Lawyer derogatory remarks, Lawyer discipline, Lawyer disobeying order of tribunal, Lawyer disrupting tribunal, Lawyer disruptive conduct, Lawyer disruptive litigation conduct, Lawyer ethics, Lawyer Ethics and Professionalism, Lawyer false statements, Lawyer sanctions